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Frequently Asked Questions

What is WIA?

What is WIOA?

What is a “One-Stop” Center?

Does “One-Stop” mean customers only have to go one place for all of the workforce services they need?

How do I find out where to go for workforce services in my community?

Do all One-Stop Centers offer the same services?

Do One-Stop Centers serve persons with disabilities?

Can I access workforce resources from my computer at home or from my office?

What is On-the-Job Training (OJT)?

Are the “rules” the same for all local workforce investment areas?

What is an Individual Training Account (ITA)?

What training providers are eligible to receive Workforce Investment Act (WIA) training services under the Individual Training Account (ITA)?

Who approves an ITA?

What criteria are used to determine who does and who does not get an Individual Training Account (ITA)? Is it based only on economic need?

Is there a maximum ITA dollar amount? What is WIA?

 


 

What is WIA?

WIA stands for the Workforce Investment Act of 1998, implemented in Georgia in July 2000. This federal legislation has helped Georgia move toward a comprehensive, customer-focused workforce investment system where Job Seeker and Employer customers alike can access a wide range of workforce-related tools and information they need to manage their work lives. Services are provided through a network of One-Stop Centers statewide.

 

What is WIOA? 

The Workforce Innovation & Opportunity Act provides resources, services and leadership tools for the workforce system to help individuals find good jobs and stay employed and improves employer prospects for success in the global marketplace. The  Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act reforms and modernizes the public workforce system. It ensures that the workforce system operates as a comprehensive, integrated and streamlined system to provide pathways to prosperity for those it serves and continuously improves the quality and performance of its services.  

 

What is a “One-Stop” Center?

The Workforce Investment Act (WIA) requires that each service delivery area (there are 20 in Georgia) have at least one comprehensive or full-service One-Stop Center. A One-Stop Center is a place where Employers and Job Seekers can access a wide range of workforce services. In Georgia, there are over 45 “full-service” One-Stop Centers, and most areas have several other locations for accessing workforce services also. A majority of the full-service locations are GDOL Career Centers, while others are separate facilities. Many different education, training, and employment-related services available in the community are also provided by a variety of partner agencies at the One-Stop Center or through referrals.

 

Does “One-Stop” mean customers only have to go one place for all of the workforce services they need?

At One-Stops, every effort is made to make it as easy and convenient as possible for Employer and Job Seeker customers to get the customized services they need. Many customers will be able to get everything they need from a single location, during a single visit or multiple visits. Other customers may need services that are not available onsite. In these situations, One-Stop staff will facilitate necessary linkages and referrals.

 

How do I find out where to go for workforce services in my community?

There are 20 Workforce Investment Act (WIA) service areas in Georgia, and each area has at least one comprehensive or full-service One-Stop Workforce Center providing services. Most areas have several locations for accessing services. These service access points may include GDOL career centers, One-Stop Centers, technical colleges, Voc Rehab offices, Department of Family and Children Services (DFCS) offices, or other community based organizations.

 

Do all One-Stop Centers offer the same services?

While One-Stops offer many of the same services, there are differences among One-Stops services based on the needs of Employer and Job Seeker customers in the community. For example, while all One-Stops provide workforce resource areas with a variety of self-service options online or through books, videos, or pamphlets, a One-Stop Center may offer specialized services for Hispanic Employers and Job Seekers, or youth. Contact the center in your community to learn about the specific services that are available.

 

Do One-Stop Centers serve persons with disabilities?

Yes. Georgia’s local One-Stops have been designed and equipped to ensure that all customers can access the services and programs they need. One-Stops comply with accessibility and reasonable accommodation provisions of the Workforce Investment Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards, and the Georgia Accessibility Code. Additionally, One-Stops can provide adaptations to help customers with visual, hearing, mobility, and cognitive or language impairments access services.

 

Can I access workforce resources from my computer at home or from my office?

Yes, many excellent workforce resources for both Employers and Job Seekers are available online – starting with the wide range of services and links available through this Georgia Department of Labor web site. Some customers can get everything they need without ever coming into a One-Stop Center. Other customers begin their research and exploration of services at home, and then visit a One-Stop Center for staff assistance. Yet other customers prefer to visit their local One-Stop, or do not have ready access to a computer at home or at the office.

 

What is On-the-Job Training (OJT)?

In On-the-Job Training, participants are employed and trained by an employer, and the employer is reimbursed up to 50 percent of the wage rate of the participant for a limited period of time. OJT helps employers defray the costs of providing the training and additional supervision related to the training of new employees.

 

Are the “rules” the same for all local workforce investment areas?

Although there are broad federal Workforce Investment Act (WIA) guidelines that guide all 20 local areas in Georgia, there is also great flexibility for local areas to develop policies and procedures that meet the unique needs of their communities, including Employer and Job Seekers customers.

 

What is an Individual Training Account (ITA)?

ITA stands for the Individual Training Account system, the primary way for Georgia’s adults and dislocated workers to access Workforce Investment Act (WIA) funded occupational training. An Individual Training Account (ITA) is essentially a voucher given to customers who need occupational skills training to become gainfully employed or reemployed. Supported by assessment and informed decision making, customers may use their ITAs to purchase training slots in any program on the eligible program/provider list. Since each of the 20 local workforce boards in Georgia may establish monetary, categorical, and time limits for such vouchers – there may be differences among areas.

 

What training providers are eligible to receive Workforce Investment Act (WIA) training services under the Individual Training Account (ITA)?

Providers and their programs eligible to apply for approval/certification under the WIA include universities, colleges, community colleges, technical institutes, some proprietary schools, apprenticeship programs, public and private training providers - including entities such as vocational-technical schools, community and faith-based organizations, private training companies, labor organizations, employer organizations, and private individuals.

Please contact the WIA Administrator in your local workforce area to learn more about the Individual Training Account Eligible Provider/Program system in your area.

 

Who approves an ITA?

Depending upon local policy, the ITA may be approved by a customer’s career advisor, a committee, a representative of a local workforce board, or other mechanisms. This process will reflect what is determined locally to provide the appropriate balance between accountability for training funds and effective customer service.

 

What criteria are used to determine who does and who does not get an Individual Training Account (ITA)? Is it based only on economic need?

No. Each local workforce board (there are 20 in Georgia) defines local criteria for providing ITAs based on critical local workforce needs. For example, criteria may be set related to economic development priorities, occupations in demand in the area, and expected wage levels - so long as the criteria are reasonable and uniformly applied.

 

Is there a maximum ITA dollar amount?

Yes. ITA accounts are the responsibility of local workforce boards, which may establish total and categorical caps, length of time, mechanisms for payment, and other criteria.